Richard M. Anglemyer

Richard (Rick) Anglemyer is the Director of Human Factors Training Programs for Southern California Safety Institute.

Rick has forty years aviation experience and is a retired U.S. Air Force pilot having flown C-130s, T-38s, T-41s, UV-18s (Twin Otters) and C-12s (Beechcraft Super King Air 200s) during his career. Following release from active duty, he flew commercially in B-727s and DC-9s. For the past nineteen years, he has been involved exclusively with aviation safety training concentrating on the human element. Rick specializes in a variety of aviation safety related training to include: Crew Resource Management (CRM) training for flight crews, dispatchers, operation managers and Air Traffic Controllers; Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) for mechanics and technicians; human performance analysis in aircraft accident investigations; and human factors in safety management systems.

Rick has over thirty years experience in training design, development and instruction in aviation operations and maintenance. As a facilitator, quality assurance supervisor and lead instructor in CRM, MRM and aviation human factors training, he has facilitated seminars/workshops and conducted simulator training domestically and internationally. His students consist of personnel from federal regulatory agencies, airlines, militaries and corporations from throughout the world. Additionally, he teaches human factor analysis for aircraft accident investigation and human factors in safety management systems. He has instructed for Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and is a member of the International Society of Air Safety Investigators (ISASI).

As the director of human factors training programs for Southern California Safety Institute he has designed, developed and conducted human factors courses for commercial and military aviation organizations. He has taught MRM to several thousand mechanics in hundreds of workshops. Rick most recently designed, developed and taught the initial courses in Human Factors in Aviation Maintenance (HFAM) for the U.S. Air Force and FAA. His HFAM course for the FAA’s Aviation Safety Inspectors has been approved as an FAA-accepted training program.

Rick holds a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree with emphasis in personnel management and a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree in marketing.

Mike Blackman

Mike Blackman is a family man, married with a two year old son, and a cat named Daisy.

He brings to SCSI 25 years of avionics experience and a passion for avionics and aircraft. Mike is currently the Field Service Specialist at Bombardier’s Business Aircraft Customer Response team with responsibility for the innovative SmartFix Plus troubleshooting program. He also leads a team that investigates, and validates, the implementation of new and leading edge technologies on all new Bombardier Business aircraft programs. Prior to expanding his forte to include field service, Mike was Bombardier’s Senior Avionics Instructor at the Montreal Customer Training Center for 10 years (he initially planned to be at the training center for three years but was having too much fun). In this capacity he was responsible for the Development and maintenance of Global, Challenger, and Learjet, Avionics and Electrical courses. Mike lead the team that developed the avionics training program for the Global Express aircraft which was one of the first in Canada to get EASA B2 certification.

Mike’s previous position was Senior Support Engineer for Litton Systems Canada, located in Nova Scotia, where he was a Project Lead for Navigation Systems Integration and Testing for military programs.

Mike was introduced to aviation and avionics in the Canadian Air Force. In the Air Force Mike received his avionics training along with EMC/EMI and project management training. This lead to a life of seeing the world and experiencing places like Thule, Greenland in January. Mike started as an avionics technician, progressed to an aircraft crew chief and then completed his military career as a project manager in the Maritime Patrol Aircraft flight test group. He was frequently recognized for his work in the military culminating with the Canadian Air Force’s highest commendation for his role in the design and installation of a new weather radar system in the Maritime Patrol Aircraft fleet.

Nigel Breyley

Nigel has over 30 years of aviation experience starting with a career in the Royal Navy where he flew as an Observer (Naval Flight Officer) in Sea King airborne early warning helicopters and the Canberra T-17 electronic warfare aircraft on loan to the Royal Air Force. His final post in the Royal Navy was as Head of the Air Training Department at a major air station managing the design and delivery of training for a new aircraft type. He remains active in the Reserve as an Air Operations Officer and has worked frequently on exercises with both USAF and the USN squadrons.

After working with several US based defense contractors delivering flying operations to support NATO, Nigel joined the UK Civil Aviation Authority and worked closely with European Authorities and the FAA to develop the operating rules for ETOPS.

After leaving the CAA, Nigel has been a licensed crew resource management instructor since 2006 and delivered numerous training packages to both civil and military audiences. Most recently he has specialized in unmanned aviation, where he has been employed as a trials pilot for the last eight years and attended the USN Test Pilot School in 2005 for the short course in Unmanned Aircraft Test & Evaluation. His work has also involved the development of safety management systems for hazardous aerial activities ranging from missile firings to unmanned maritime surveillance projects and the operation of aerostats. In the unmanned field he has investigated a number of accidents and incidents with a particular emphasis on the human factors aspects utilizing his experience of operating systems from a range of international manufacturers.

Nigel also holds a diploma in journalism and has contributed over the years to many aviation and travel publications. His flying experience in the US has included flying in a Cessna Skyhawk from dirt strips in Arizona to seeing Florida upside down in an F/A-18 and operating a remotely-piloted aircraft over Oregon.

Timothy Creaghan

Mr. Timothy Creaghan recently completed 35 year career in service with a government ANS and a world leading private air navigation service provider. He now applies his proven experience in safety and operations management to clients who wish to use the “Global Aviation Safety Roadmap” to reach the highest levels of risk management and efficiency. Until his retirement, Mr Creaghan was employed as the Shift Manager by NAV CANADA in the Moncton Area Control Centre, a 24/7 function shared by a team of NAV CANADA shift managers. Mr. Creaghan was the first line operations manager for a major NAV CANADA Area Control Centre, the first point of contact for customers, unionized workforce, Transport Canada, Transportation Safety Board and adjacent Canadian and US control centres. He made decisions regarding staffing, overtime hiring, flow control, contingency plan activations, incidents and accidents, short notice military exercises, and reserved airspace for Moncton ACC and the entire Moncton FIR. Highlighting his career, Mr. Creaghan oversaw the establishment of NAV CANADA’s Confidential Safety Reporting System, ARGUS, developed, edited and produced NAV CANADA Safety Insight newsletter, implemented NAV CANADA’s Runway Incursion Data Gathering project, and developed NAV CANADA’s Observer Program to TSB investigations. He was the company representative to TSB investigations of ACA646 crash, Fredericton NB, 1997; SWR111 crash Peggy’s Cove September 2, 1998; Fatal mid-air collision at Penticton BC, August 1999.

Tracy G. Dillinger

Dr. Tracy Dillinger is a United States Air Force officer currently on assignment to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in Washington, DC.

Prior to this assignment she was the Chief, Air Force Aviation Psychology at the United States Air Force Safety Center. In that capacity. Dr. Dillinger oversees all human factors investigation in USAF aviation accidents to determine the role human behavior and training played in each accident. In addition, she evaluates the adequacy of corrective actions recommended by the aircraft accident investigation teams. Dr. Dillinger is also the Team Chief for an Air Force-wide Organizational Safety Assessments. Dr. Dillinger is a recognized expert in witness interviewing, especially interviews of difficult witnesses who, because of their personal involvement, are reluctant to communicate essential details necessary for the investigation. She developed a witness interview guide for use by investigation teams currently published in AFPam 91-211. Dr Dillinger took part in the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) this spring and returned to the Air Force Safety Center in July 2003.

Dr. Dillinger received both her B.A. and M.A. from the University of Iowa, a Psy.D. in Psychology from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, and just completed a Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the University of Illinois in Aviation Psychology. She is an Associate Fellow of the Aerospace Medicine Association, and a member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the Society of Air Force Clinical Psychologists, and the Association of Aviation Psychologists.

Mike Doiron

Mike is a recognized expert in the development of safety awareness training and specializes in Risk Management programs and Safety Management Systems, Crew Resource Management, Pilot Decision Making, Human Performance in Aircraft Maintenance, Human Factors in ATC Operations, Company Aviation Safety Officer training and Human Factors in Airport Operations.

For over 10 years, he served as an Aviation Safety Inspector with Transport Canada, and in that capacity, he conducted Research and Development of new Safety and Awareness Programs based on identified incident trends. He was also a Risk Management facilitator for Transport Canada reporting system for the Atlantic Region and served as the Minister’s Observer on a number of high profile aircraft accidents, most notable being the SWR111 accident September 2, 1998 and the MK 1602 Cargo B747 accident in Halifax 2004. He also provided Safety and Security guidance within the Atlantic region during the 9/11 events.

Notably, Mike served as a facilitator and instructor for Transport Canada’s Risk Management and Safety Management Systems implementation programs. In that role, he provided training to approximately 800 Transport Canada Safety Inspectors. He also evaluated the implementation and effectiveness of SMS programs for various operators.

During his tenure with the Transportation Safety Board, Canada, he completed a 14-month assignment as an Accident Investigator. He conducted investigations relating to aviation accidents, and his duties included accident investigation and determining the effectiveness of company Safety Programs.

Prior to that, Mike was Manager of the Halifax Flight Information Center in Canada. He was responsible for a large geographic area within Atlantic Canada providing weather briefing services for low-level, mid-level and high-level domestic and International flights using the full range of meteorology products and Satellite and Radar imagery. He provide flight planning services to both domestic and international flights. His other duties related to air-ground communications and airborne emergency services, airport operations, medevac, and search and rescue activity. He also assisted in the development of emergency response programs for offshore oil exploration.

Prior to that, Mike worked as a Flight Service Specialist at Halifax International Airport, where his duties included air-ground communications, emergency services, domestic and international weather briefing and flight planning services and airport operations. He also assisted in recruitment programs and the development of refresher and recurrent training.

Memberships

Member of the International Society of Air Safety Investigators (ISASI).

Served as a member for Civil Air Search and Rescue for 25 years.

Member of the Canadian Owners and Pilots Association.

Delegated Examiner Restricted Radio License Industry Canada

Notable Recent Safety Projects

2009 ISASI SMS/Accident Investigation Reachout Abu Dhabi for Etihad Airlines
2009 August Human Factor Presentations Tianjin, China
2009 March Develop Safety Programs, Medallion, Alaska
2009 April Accident Prevention, Prague
2009 April SMS Workshop, Prague
2008 October SMS Programs Embraer Paris
2008 September Presented Weather Risk Management paper ISASI conference Halifax
2008 May SMS Workshop International Crews, Prague
2008 June SMS Programs Bahrain
2008 July SMS Programs Jeddah Saudi Arabia
2008 August Company Aviation Safety Officer (SMS), Medallion Foundation, Alaska
2006 COPA award Advocate of Aviation Safety
February 2006 Aviation Accident Prevention/SMS training Dept. of the Interior, Alaska
April 2006 SMS training for International Aircrews, Prague
May 2006 Human Factor/SMS Training South Africa Accident Investigators and South Africa Weather Services
October 2006 Aviation Safety Management Systems Implementation Los Angeles
November 2006 Aviation Accident Prevention Program Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
January 2007 Aviation Safety Management Systems Implementation Los Angeles
January 2007 Aviation Safety Management Systems Aircraft Maintenance Vancouver
February 2007 Accident Prevention/SMS Program in the United Arab Emirates
March 2007 Aviation Safety Management Systems Aircraft Maintenance Winnipeg
March 2007 Aviation Safety Management Systems Aircraft Maintenance Calgary
April 2007 Accident Investigation and SMS programs Prague, Czech Republic

William Fowler

William Fowler currently serves as Director, Aircraft Accident Investigation Programs, SCSI Canada and Executive Director, SCSI Canada. He is also the lead instructor in the company’s flagship Aircraft Accident Investigation course. As Director of the AAI program, Bill draws upon his extensive experience in investigations to deliver a unique perspective not available elsewhere. His depth and breadth of knowledge are a resource SCSI is pleased to offer our students.

Before joining SCSI, Bill was Regional Manager for the Transportation Safety Board (TSB), Atlantic Region with accompanying secondments to Transport Canada Aircraft Services Directorate as both Chief Pilot Fixed Wing and as a Regional Flight Operations Manager. Prior to rejoining the TSB in 1998, he held positions in Transport Canada as Chief, Airline Inspection Division and Chief, Foreign Inspection Division with responsibility for the safety oversight of the major Canadian scheduled and charter airlines, and for foreign air operators operating into Canada, respectively.

Bill’s TSB experience includes major involvement in the Swissair 111 investigation and as Investigator-In-Charge of the MK Airlines accident at Halifax, N.S. Other TSB activities have included assignments as the temporary acting Director of Investigations and as a safety deficiency analyst, and also giving numerous safety briefings and presentations.

Bill was a B747 and B757 Captain with extensive international experience in commercial and military flight operations; and additional type ratings include the DA20, CV580, DHC7, L382, B767 and DC8. While with Transport Canada, he also flew the C550 and the KingAir C90A as a training and check pilot.

While in industry, Bill held senior Flight Operations management positions with Nationair Canada and served as President of the Nationair Flight Crew Association. He has experience as commercial and military check pilot, pilot flight instructor, military staff officer and Flight Safety Officer. He is a graduate of the Canadian Forces Command and Staff College, Advanced Management Course, Flight Safety Course, and the French Language Course.

Caj Erik Frostell

Caj Erik Frostell, one of the world's foremost experts in accident investigation, currently serves as Chief of the Accident Investigation and Prevention Section of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in Montreal. His promotion to chief of the section in 1996 followed his over 16 years of service as a section team member.

Throughout his continuing career with ICAO, Mr. Frostell has served on many special assignments. Most recently, in 1997, he served as accident investigator on a technical cooperation assignment with the Republic of Korea for the investigation of the accident to the Korean Air Boeing 747 in Guam on 6 August 1997.

Prior to that assignment, he served as accident investigator assigned to Saudi Arabia for the investigation of the mid-air collision between Saudi Arabian Airlines, .Boeing 747, and the Kazakhstan Airlines, IL-76, near New Delhi, India, on 12 November 1996.

Also in 1996, he was the team leader for the ICAO team investigating and reporting on the shooting down of two civil aircraft by Cuban military aircraft on 24 February 1996.

He also served as team leader for the ICAO team completing the investigation (December 1992 – June 1993) on the destruction of Korean Air Lines flight 007, Boeing 747 on August 31, 1983.

Before joining ICAO, Mr. Frostell was Chief of Accident Investigation with the Board of Aviation in Finland. He served in that capacity for 13 years and investigated over 300 accidents.

Mr. Frostell holds a Master of Applied Science degree from the Institute of Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, Canada; a degree in Aeronautical Engineering from the Technical University in Helsinki, Finland and received basic flight training in the Air Force in Finland.

Darren Gaines

Darren Gaines has been an Air Traffic Controller since 1991, working first as a Terminal controller at Akron/ Canton Tower, then as an En Route controller at Cleveland Center, where he is currently stationed. Mr. Gaines was recognized as the Controller of the Year in 2000 during the EAA Airventure fly-in at Oshkosh, WI. In addition to being a controller, Darren is an Aviation Safety Councilor for the FAA Flight Standards District

Office in Cleveland, OH. In 1994, Darren was selected to be an Air Safety Investigator for the National Air Traffic Controller's Association (NATCA), providing ATC expertise in numerous investigations of both accidents and incidents conducted by the NTSB. Mr. Gaines was later appointed, and currently presides, as Chairman of the NATCA Air Safety Investigations Committee. Mr. Gaines has also served two terms as Chairman of the International Society of Air Safety Investigators (ISASI) Air Traffic Services Working Group, where he promoted the improvement of aviation safety and increased exposure of innovative approaches to accident investigation internationally, and continues to do so as an active member. Darren also served as the ISASI representative to ICAO Air Traffic Management and Runway Safety awareness campaigns for the Asian

Pacific and Middle-Eastern Regions, delivering safety critical information to these regions in an effort to advance aviation safety on a global level. Darren also serves as an associate instructor at the Transportation Safety Institute where he teaches in the Human Factors course. Darren is on the staff of the Southern California Safety Institute, teaching the Air Traffic Control Investigation course. He was recognized by the East Central Ohio Pilots Association as the recipient of the 2003 Meritorious Service Award. Mr. Gaines is the holder of an FAA commercial pilots license with multi-engine, instrument, seaplane and instructor authorizations. He currently owns a 1981 Mooney and a 1946 Piper Cub and has accumulated 1500 hours flight time.

Chris Hallman

Mr. Chris Hallman is Director of Safety Management Systems with SCSI. Chris has over 28 years of aviation safety experience with industry and the U.S. Air Force. Through SCSI, Chris provides aviation human factors consulting and training to improve operational safety for organizations involved in high criticality operations. Chris was instrumental in developing and delivering Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) training to the US Air Force and Human Factors in Aviation Maintenance (HFAM) to the FAA.

Chris is the former senior manager of voluntary safety programs at Delta Air Lines. His responsibilities included leading the human factors training department, AQP, ASAP and FOQA programs. Chris attended the NASA Fatigue Countermeasures school and has assisted with fatigue research and education at Delta Air Lines and the U.S. Air Force. Chris retired from the USAF Reserve as a Lieutenant Colonel after 27 years of commissioned service. A C-130 Navigator and flying safety officer, Chris completed his Reserve career as the chief of operational risk management for Air Force Special Operations Command and a faculty curriculum developer for the distance learning program at USAF Air War College.

Christopher L. Henderson

Chris received his B.S. in Physics from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and his M.S.E.E. from the University of New Mexico. Chris is the President and one of the founders of Semitracks Inc., a United States based company that provides education and training to the semiconductor industry. Chris also teaches courses in failure analysis, reliability and semiconductor technology for the semiconductor industry. From 1988 to 2004 he worked at Sandia National Laboratories, where he was a Principal Member of Technical Staff in the Failure Analysis Department and Microsystems Partnerships Department. His job responsibilities have included reliability, failure and yield analysis of components fabricated at Sandia’s Microelectronics Development Laboratory, research into the electrical behavior of defects, and consulting on microelectronics issues for the Department of Defense. He has published over 25 papers at various conferences in semiconductor processing, reliability, failure analysis, and test. He has received two R&D 100 awards and two best paper awards. Prior to working at Sandia, Chris worked for Honeywell, BF Goodrich Aerospace, and Intel. Chris is a member of IEEE and EDFAS (the Electron Device Failure Analysis Society).

Gary T. Hook

Gary’s international experience in aviation safety has spanned more than three decades.  He served 35 years in the Canadian Air Force as a fighter pilot, senior trainer, SMS Manager and leader.  He has significant international experience as both a facilitator and trainer from Europe to Australian to all across North America.

For more than 10 years he has been directly involved in training the concepts of SMS, human factors, organizational factors, risk management, and communication on the international stage.  He has worked with major airports all across Canada, the Caribbean, Europe and Brunei.  He has worked with KLM in Amsterdam, FedEx in Memphis and a host of organizations across North America.  He is an experienced accident investigator and is the SMS and Human Factors trainer for IAAE-Canada (International Association of Airport Executives).

As a Lieutenant Colonel in the Canadian Air Force he was awarded three Commander’s Commendations, including the Air Force’s highest commendation.  The latter commendation was for his significant and lasting impact on influencing the safety culture within the Air Force for his work over six years as the Air Force SMS Manager.

As a pilot he has accumulated more than 5000 flying hours.  The majority of this time was spent on operational fighter tours in Europe (9 years) and Canada. His last regular force assignment was as Commandant, Central Flying School.  In addition to serving as the Commander’s Senior advisor for all flying training, he was also in charge of the Canadian Air Force’s training for Human Performance in Military Aviation, a composite program that covers MRM, CRM and TRM at all levels.

A brief overview of his extensive international experience with both civilian and military organizations includes:

  • Has worked as a lead trainer with SCSI since 2003 in areas of human factors, SMS, risk management, MRM, organizational change, human factors in maintenance, witness interviewing and  SMS in Healthcare
  • Conducted workshops on SMS, occurrence investigation, risk management, human and organizational factors for  major airports including: Calgary, Nanaimo, Ottawa, St Johns, Winnipeg, Vancouver, and the Grand Caymans International airports
  • Serves as the trainer for  the International Association of Airport Executives – Canada in SMS, Human Factors, and Training the Trainer 
  • Completely redesigned the Canadian Air Force Safety Management System processes and training.  He has trained more than 900 military personnel in SMS, human factors, and risk management
  • Served as the SMS Manager for the Air Force for six years and was awarded two commendations for his leadership and enhancement of the Air Force safety culture
  • Keynote speaker at numerous conferences including the 9th International Symposium for Australian Aviation Psychologists, Coalition of Airline Pilots Association (CAPA) Annual Safety Conference, and SWIFT
  • Presented major workshops at both the International Symposium in Aviation Psychology and Transport Canada’s Canadian Aviation Safety Seminar
  • A regular presenter at the SWIFT Conference(Summer Winter Integrated Field Technologies), the world’s premier airfield conference.
  • He serves as the Chairman of the NATO Human Factors Working Group as part of his duties as an Air Force  Reserve Officer
  • Has conducted two SMS training sessions for the NATO Airborne Early Warning component in Geilenkirchen, Germany
  • Outside of aviation he has presented major workshops to the Nuclear Energy Board of Canada, Manitoba Hydro and Sigfusson Northern Construction
  • He is also a certified facilitator for the Stephen Covey workshops having trained more than 1000 people
  • For 12 years has been the key facilitator for the Air Force training of supervisors associated with flying operations.  He has trained more than 800 professionals in this discipline
  • Conducted several leadership workshops for the Department of National Defence Fire Chiefs
  • Developed and delivered training workshops for major Canadian airports in:
    • Risk Management
    • Occurrence Investigation
    • How to be an Effective Supervisor
    • Training the Trainer

Gary resides in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada with his wife Charmaine.  He has two children, Nicholas and Caroline, one granddaughter Jaedyn and a flock of four legged ‘furries’ to bring more life into the household!

E. John Kennedy

Dr. Kennedy is a graduate of the University of Iowa College of Medicine, having received his degree in 1962, and also the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine in 1968, receiving his certificate in Internal Medicine.

He has been a Senior Lecturer since 1972 at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California in Aviation Safety, teaching Bio-Medicine and High Altitude Physiology. Dr. Kennedy is currently a lecturer at the Southern California Safety Institute in Aviation Physiology for Professional Programs.

Dr. Kennedy completed the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine and obtained the rating of Flight Surgeon in 1963. He served as Flight Surgeon member of a USAF Class A Mishap Investigation Board.

He maintains a full time internal medicine practice with many patients from the aviation field. Dr. Kennedy has developed course materials for NP65 Aviation Safety Courses, and participated in development of an FAA video on mid-air collision avoidance.

Dr. Kennedy is a member of the Aerospace Medical Association, Air Force Association, California Medical Association, Monterey County Medical Association, Tailhook Association and a Past President of the Tri-County American Heart Association.

Dr. Kennedy has had the opportunity of experiencing the thrill of flying during an air show with the Thunderbirds. He has catapulted from a carrier in an F-4 and trapped successfully, and has flown supersonic in an F-18 Hornet, all the while never touching the controls!

Candace K. Kolander

Candace K. Kolander is the Coordinator for the Air Safety, Health and Security Department at the Washington, DC office of the Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA-CWA). As such, she works with the Director to accomplish the research, regulatory and training mission of the department by providing services to the AFA-CWA membership, International Officers and its Board of Directors. She is also one of the main contacts in the department to deal with security issues. Ms. Kolander is the liaison between the safety chairs at the carriers and the International AFA-CWA office. She also reviews and comments on proposed regulatory changes, advisory circulars and handbook changes. She also responds to AFA-CWA member carrier aviation accidents as well as provides the training and assistance to AFA-CWA participants in National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) accident investigations. The AFA-CWA represents 55,000 flight attendants at 20 airlines.

Ms. Kolander was a flight attendant for 22 years. While at her carrier she served in multiple roles representing flight attendants in addition to helping plan and teach flight attendant recurrent training.

She currently serves as a Subcommittee member for the NASA ASRS (National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Aviation Safety Reporting System) representing US flight attendants and is the chair of the Cabin Group at the Aviation InfoShare meetings with deal with voluntary reporting systems. She is also a member of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee and a flight attendant representative on the industry Master Minimum Equipment List (MMEL) Subcommittee.

Ms. Kolander worked on a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC) tasked with re-writing the training regulations for crewmembers in the US. The documents have not been published yet. In addition to these larger committees, she has worked on other smaller industry working groups to represent flight attendants.

Dallas C. Lane

Dallas is a private-independent fire/explosion investigator. He has been a firefighter/fire marshal/fire investigator for 30 years. Mr. Lane is a Certified Fire Investigator, Certified Fire & Explosion Investigator, Board Certified Forensic Examiner, and Certified Fire Investigation Instructor. He has instructed fire investigation courses for community colleges, Arizona State Fire Marshal's Office, National Fire Academy Outreach Program, and the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. He is a current active fire investigator and firefighter. He is a Captain in the Civil Air Patrol assigned as the Search & Rescue Officer for the State Of Arizona and as such is involved in aircraft related mishaps.

David McNair

David McNair is a Senior Investigator in Canada with the federal government agency responsible for conducting aviation safety investigations. He has a wealth of experience in operational flying and safety investigation. Having flown a number of different aircraft, including jet fighters, large turboprop and jet transport airplanes, in a variety of roles, his flying background includes tactical airlift, world-wide international flying experience as a check captain, flight test programs and VIP flying. David is a current Airline Transport Rated Pilot, flying as a captain of a corporate jet aircraft. He is a Professional Engineer of the Province of Ontario.

David has participated in many Canadian or foreign investigations as Investigator-in-Charge or as a team member. He has been the Accredited Representative for a variety of foreign accident investigations involving Canadian manufactured aviation products or Canadian operators. David was a Delegate for Canada at the ICAO AIG 2008 Divisional Meeting at Montreal, where Annex 13 and other related ICAO documents were updated. He has been an instructor at the Singapore Aviation Academy since 2002 and is a member of the International Society of Air Safety Investigation Investigators (ISASI) and the Australian Aviation Psychology Association (AAvPA).

Eugene W. Meng

Mr. Meng is a Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator (CFEI), and Forensic Engineer with more than 30 years of hands-on experience in Failure Analysis. He has implemented projects for NASA/FAA, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Defense Research and Engineering Attache' of the Embassy of France, the Aero Industry Development Corporation (Taiwan). Early in his career, he was a Test and Development Engineer at the Phoenix Proving Grounds of International Harvester, testing earthmovers. Later, he was a Project Engineer for Dynamic Science, Inc., where he carried out Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard compliance crash testing, and was involved in the NASA/FAA Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) at Edwards Air Force Base, involving a full-scale crash test of a Boeing 720B. One of the chief experiments in this project was the use of anti-misting kerosene (AMK) to reduce the “fireball” effect when an airliner fuel tank ruptures on impact. He was involved in the development and testing of the TFE1042 turbine engine for the Indigenous Defense Fighter (IDF) for the Taiwanese Air Force (ROCAF). He is currently an independent Failure Analysis Consultant, in which capacity he performs Engineering Investigations of incidents ranging from mechanical failures, industrial and/or vehicle accidents to product defect analysis and new product and process development. His clients include insurance companies, law firms, and companies involved in engineering, manufacturing, and product/process development. He has been called as an expert witness for cases in litigation in several states.

Ladislav Mika

  • 1971 to 1978, Czechoslovak Airlines Chief of the Office of the Flight Director

  • Since 1978, Ministry of Transport, Civil Aviation Department, Chief of the Flight Operations Division.

  • 1986 - present time, Second and First Vice-Chairman, European Air Navigation Planning Group, ICAO

  • Since 1997, Member, ECAC Group of Experts on Accident Investigation.

  • 23 years, Permanent State Commission for investigation of Air Accidents, Czech Republic.

  • Member, Group of Eurocontrol-European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation, and member of ISASI.

Richard L. Perry

Dick Perry has over thirty years of increasing responsibility in risk management, aviation safety, and flight operations. Mr. Perry is a retired USAF officer and pilot. He was the Director of System Safety and Engineering at the US Air Force Safety Agency. There, he led an engineering team providing independent engineering analysis for accident investigation and risk management and for evaluating the safety of new aircraft acquisitions and modifications. Mr. Perry established and supervised Air Force System Safety policy and programs for integrating operations, maintenance, and manufacturer resources in assessing risk and addressing safety concerns. He was the Chairman of the Joint Services System Safety Committee responsible for coordinating system safety programs and policy within the Department of Defense and with civilian industry. He also worked with the Electronic Industry Association to develop a civilian alternative to the government System Safety standard (MIL STD 882C). Mr. Perry led the team which developed the Air Transportation Oversight System used by the FAA to evaluate the safety of U.S. commercial aviation. He also directed the FAA’s Airworthiness Assurance Nondestructive Inspection Validation Center at Sandia National Laboratories to enhance safety and improve efficiency by identifying promising new aircraft inspection and maintenance technologies and assisting in deploying them to the aviation industry. Throughout his career he maintained a working relationship with safety professionals in the airline and aircraft manufacturing industries. He is a Member of the International Society of Air Safety Investigators and the International System Safety Society. He has been a presenter at numerous international seminars on aviation safety.

Mike Poole

Mike is a Professional Engineer with a current pilot's license and has considerable expertise in the field of flight data analysis. He chaired the Flight Recorder Working Group of the International Society of Air Safety Investigators and represented Canada as the national expert panel member to ICAO’s Flight Recorder Panel. He started in the field of aircraft accident investigation in 1977 and has worked for more than 20 years with the Transportation Safety Board of Canada. For the last 15 years of his career at TSB, he was the head of the flight recorder and performance laboratory, which he developed for the Board. He was the Flight Recorder Group Chairman on all major accidents in Canada as well as several international accidents during his tenure as the Recorder Laboratory Head.

Mike started a small aerospace company called Flightscape which grew to approximately 20 staff before it was acquired by CAE in August 2007. He left CAE in May of 2013 to start a new subject matter expertise based company called Plane Sciences, primarily to support the flight data analysis community.

Steve Preteska

Steve Preteska brings a unique depth and breadth of experience and education to safety program management and modern aircraft mishap investigator training. While on active duty at the USAF Safety Center, Steve was part of the cadre that implemented the investigation methodology that is now standard practice for the USAF and many other national air forces. His aggressive promotion of risk management techniques and passion for the investigation process earned him widespread respect. His ability to pass on this wealth of knowledge continues to bolster his reputation as a subject matter expert and a superbly effective instructor.

Educated as a mechanical engineer at the US Air Force Academy, Steve went to work in the satellite business after graduation. His technical prowess warranted assignment to both launch and on-orbit test teams. He was often chosen to be part of the “Tiger Teams” that were formed to resolve time-critical, on-orbit anomalies. USAF Undergraduate Pilot Training interrupted post-baccalaureate engineering classes at the University of Southern California. Steve later applied that coursework to his graduate degree at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University where he earned a M.S. in Aeronautical Science. Later, as part of his assignment to the USAF Safety Center, he attended the USAF Aircraft Mishap Investigation Course (AMIC), the USAF Jet Engine Mishap Investigation Course (JEMIC), Royal Canadian AF Flight Safety Officer Course, and the USAF Risk Management Course.

Steve Preteska added Life Support Officer training to his resume while he was a combat-qualified F-111F aircraft commander, and began his formal teaching career as a T-38 Instructor Pilot during a subsequent tour of duty. Seizing a unique opportunity, Steve attended and graduated as a distinguished graduate of the USAF Air Traffic Control School. He returned to flying the T-38 while his primary duties included managing one of the USAF’s largest airfield and air traffic control complexes at a joint-use field.

His air traffic control, airfield management, and operational flying expertise combined with an engineering background made him a natural for assignment as a USAF mishap investigator and Safety Center action officer. Steve worked F-117, U-2, and F-16 mishap boards while at the Safety Center, and was later the Investigating Officer on F-15 and T-38 Class A investigations. These investigations and his work as a General Officer’s Executive Officer marked him as a highly skilled investigator and effective communicator. Civilian commercial single/multi-engine, instrument, and glider pilot ratings enhance his aviation credibility and he continues to expand his flying horizons by exploring the airspace over New Mexico as an avid sailplane pilot.

Steve’s passion for safety education carries over to his personal life, as he is an active Motorcycle Safety Foundation Rider-Coach and New Mexico Hunter Safety Instructor. He also enjoys the opportunity to teach for ERAU’s Kirtland AFB campus and in the Los Alamos School District where his youngest daughter attends high school.

Tom Salmon

Tom is a respected authority in the design and facilitation of aviation human factors training. His exceptional 40-year record as a premier performer in military and commercial aviation is one reason why students who enroll at the Southern California Safety Institute enjoy a valuable learning experience.

Tom graduated from the US Air Force Academy with a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in engineering management. He was awarded a graduate scholarship, attended the Anderson School of Management at the University of California, Los Angeles and earned a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree, specializing in organization theory, organizational behavior and finance. After graduating from US Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training, Tom flew the C-141 internationally before being selected to become an instructor on the US Air Force Academy faculty in the Department of Economics and Management. During his four-year tenure on the Academy faculty, Tom instructed in nine different courses, served as the Course Director for three courses and won the award as the Outstanding Instructor on the US Air Force Academy faculty, Department of Economics and Management. Tom also flew the CT-39 Sabreliner as the pilot for the US Air Force Academy Superintendent, Dean and Commandant and served as a Director on the National Board of Directors for the US Air Force Academy Association of Graduates. Tom left the active duty US Air Force (USAF) to fly for Continental Airlines, and he joined the USAF Reserve.

In the USAF Reserve, Tom served in critical operational and high-level leadership positions. As a USAF Admissions Liaison Officer, he created and implemented a highly successful training program for 2,000 Admissions Liaison Officers worldwide. He served as an Operations Officer at HQ US Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) where he provided aviation expertise for operations and exercises to USSOUTHCOM and the 302 Airlift Wing (AW). He was the sole designer and instructor of the 302AW Aircrew Coordination Training Program. Tom also served as the Executive Officer to the Commander-in-Chief (CINC), US Space Command (USSPACECOM), and North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and Commander (CC) Air Force Space Command (AFSPC). He was the principal assistant to the CINC/CC; and interfaced directly with Congressional staffs, the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Joint and Service staffs, the Canadian National Defence HQ and major commands on all matters involving the CINC/CC. He routinely handled extremely sensitive issues and diplomatically synchronized the efforts of a multi-national staff. Tom, as the Individual Mobilization Augmentee (IMA) to the HQ USSPACECOM Vice Director of Operations, provided operational guidance and oversight to Air Force, Navy and Army Space Commands with forces deployed worldwide, and he also served as the Director of the USSPACECOM Battle Staff and Crisis Action Team. Using his extensive design skills in aviation human factors training, Tom totally revised the 20th AF helicopter pilot Crew Resource Management (CRM) training and introduced proven techniques to reduce accidents. He also personally developed the requirements for Air Combat Command (ACC) to outsource CRM training for all ACC pilots. Tom ultimately served as the Mobilization Assistant (MA) to the Director of Operations (DO), HQ AFSPC. Notably he designed and implemented operations policies and training programs for all AFSPC operations worldwide and he represented the HQ AFSPC DO working with top-level military and civilian officials and aerospace senior executives.

At Continental Airlines, Tom served in a wide range of operational positions. He was a Captain and Line Check Airman on the B727-100-200, a Continental CRM Designer and Facilitator, an internal management consultant for the Continental Total Quality Leadership Program and a Captain, Line Check Airman, Simulator Instructor and Simulator Check Airman on the B737-300-500-700-800-900. Tom skillfully integrated human factors principles into the Continental B737 training curriculum and his work qualified the Continental B737 Training Program to upgrade to the FAA Advanced Qualification Program (AQP). During his 29 years at Continental Tom evolved as a recognized authority on CRM curriculum design and facilitation. He created and facilitated CRM courses for Continental pilots, flight attendants, maintenance personnel, and dispatchers and he also trained Continental CRM instructors. In 1987, Tom designed and facilitated for the Continental mechanics the first maintenance human factors training program in the US airline industry. In 1994 he designed and facilitated for the Continental pilots the first threat and error management human factors training program in the US airline industry. He has also performed CRM training for Transport Canada, the US Drug Enforcement Agency, the US Coast Guard, and airlines outside the US.

Tom currently consults and specializes in human factors training for fixed base operators. His highly effective training program helped one fixed base operator experience a zero accident rate for the one-year period following the training and an associated 50% decrease in their insurance premiums. Tom is a firm believer that accident prevention via human factors training is an excellent investment.

Frank H. Snapp

Frank Snapp joined the Southern California Safety Institute faculty in 1995 and teaches Safety Management Systems, Operational Risk Management, Aircraft Accident Investigation, and Photography for Aircraft Accident Investigators.

He is a retired U.S. Air Force pilot who logged more than 4400 flying hours in the B-52 and T-37 aircraft while managing mishap prevention programs and investigating aircraft mishaps. After completing pilot training in 1971, he was assigned to the 2nd Bombardment Wing at Barksdale AFB, Louisiana as a B-52 pilot and aircraft commander. His career in the safety profession began in 1979 while he was assigned to Williams AFB, Arizona as a T-37 instructor pilot, where he was Chief of Flight Safety for the 82nd Flying Training Wing. That assignment was followed by a return to the B-52 as an aircraft commander and instructor pilot at K.I. Sawyer AFB, Michigan, where he became the Chief of Safety for the 410th Bombardment Wing. In this capacity his duties were expanded to include flying safety, ground and industrial safety, explosives and missile safety, and nuclear w3apons safety and security.

In 1988, he was assigned to the U.S. Air Force Inspection and Safety Center, Norton AFB, California, as Chief of the Final Evaluations Division. There he evaluated the reports of every major aircraft mishap in the U.S. Air Force and prepared the final position that directed corrective action. He also developed and implemented mishap prevention programs for the B-2, F-117, U-2, and SR-71 aircraft. In 1993, he relocated with the Air Force Safety Center to Kirtland AFB, New Mexico and assumed duties and Chief, Bomber/Transport Division where he was responsible for oversight of accident prevention efforts for the Air Force’s bomber, aerial tanker, airlift, and helicopter aircraft. During this assignment he wrote the original Air Force Instruction 91-202, The Air Force Mishap Prevention Program.

Frank has been an instructor with SCSI for more than ten years.

He has a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Maryland, and a Master of Arts in Administration from Northern Michigan University.

Arthur Torosian

Arthur Torosian has a broad and diverse background in aviation. He has experience in safety, technical and operational aspects of concept, design, testing, certification and in-service phases of commercial aircraft. Mr. Torosian has extensive association with domestic and international airlines, aircraft manufacturers and Government and industry agencies. He worked for Douglas Aircraft Company as engineering test pilot, chief pilot, manager research and development for flight operations, and Director of Performance and Control. He was the Director for Manned Orbital Laboratory Program from 1965 to 1967 and also directed Flight Operations at the USAF Experimental Pilot School from 1961 to 1966.

Mr. Torosian has an MS in Aeronautical Engineering from California Institute of Technology and a BS in Aeronautical Engineering from the University of Illinois. He is a member of AIAA, SAE, Society of Experimental Test Pilots, Sigma Gamma Tau, and the SAE-7 Committee. He is type rated in the DC-8, MD80/DC-9 and DC-10 aircraft.

David L. Walsh

David has over thirty years experience in the aviation industry. During his time in the industry he worked as a commercial pilot and as an aircraft maintenance engineer and as a Director of Maintenance. He also worked many years for Transport Canada as a Civil Aviation Safety Inspector and as a Superintendent. As Superintendent David was responsible for coordinating oversight activities for several Regional Airlines and Approved Aircraft Maintenance Organizations.

While with Transport Canada he worked with many companies on improving their own Quality Assurance and Safety programs. He also worked with companies developing and managing; Voluntary Disclosure Programs, Error Management Programs and Internal Incident Investigation Programs.

David participated in the developmental process of a Safety Management System for one of Canada’s major air carriers. He was involved in the review and acceptance process of several Air Operator’s Safety Management System policy and procedures.

David has two undergraduate degrees, (BBA and BSc). He holds both a Canadian Aircraft Maintenance Engineers License and a Commercial Pilot License.

David currently works as an aviation consultant conducting audits and advising companies on regulatory requirements and managing their internal quality and safety programs. He also teaches Safety Management System course to local flight departments and assists aviation organizations in the development of their own safety management policies and procedures.

David is also an aviation safety instructor for both IATA and the Southern California Safety Institute. He was involved in the development of several fully narrated Distance Learning courses on Aviation Safety Management Systems. He has delivered safety presentations to; airport groups, general aviation organizations, commercial and corporate air operators and aircraft maintenance organizations.

David travelled to Sanya China November of 2010 for SCSI to teach a tailored aviation safety course to Hainan Airline personnel.

David has travelled to Africa on many occasions to deliver Aviation Safety Courses on behalf of IATA. He recently acted as instructor for two Emergency Response courses designed and delivered in partnership with CAMIC. The courses were delivered to Chinese airport and airline security personnel. The first course was delivered in Montreal, Canada, (January 2011), and the second in Paris, France, (March 2011).

Thomas R. Wondrock

Thomas R. Wondrock has worked as an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) engineer in the field of gas turbine engine design, development, manufacturing and test for Pratt & Whitney for more that 35 years. He has extensive experience with many military and commercial gas turbine engine models current and past.

He has acted as technical advisor on several powerplant related mishaps providing analysis, recommendations and corrective actions.

He has acted as the Senior Propulsion Flight Test Representative at Edwards Air Force Base and performed flight testing on the F-15 / F-16 and NASA’s ACTIVE and VISTA flight test programs at Dryden Space Flight Center in California.